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Tony Price - Life & Times
essay by James Rutherford
     
      The next several years were one of the most important periods in Price’s career but also one of the most difficult personally. In 1989 a group of Price’s friends and associates established a non-profit organization called TENGAM (magnet in reverse) and secured a gallery space in Santa Fe’s famous art district on Canyon Road owned by philanthropist, Ed Bass, and operated by an advocacy organization for Tibetan refugees called Project Tibet. Upon renovation of a former dojo, Price installed over a hundred pieces of Atomic Art inside and in an adjacent sculpture garden. Support came from donations from visitors and individuals, sales of posters and various charitable events sponsored by the TENGAM Board. Staffed by volunteers and often by Price himself, the facility attracted thousands of visitors during more than two years of operation. In 1991 Price was honored with a visit of the spiritual leader of Tibet, His Holiness the 14th Dalai Lama, who had come to bless the Project Tibet compound. Upon viewing Price’s collection of Atomic Art he commented: “Tony Price is very clever. He has done something useful with something that is not useful”. Other Tibetans also explained that in Tibetan, the word “tengam” actually translates as “the place within the temple where the most precious objects are kept”



Tony Price - Life & Times
essay by James Rutherford